Outlaws

What does warmth in today’s society look like? We have many families where it seems to take two incomes to support a household. Both parents are rushed to get projects finished at work, taking on extra duties to keep their job. Healthcare is oftentimes the carrot dangling out in front of these particular employees especially. Even if they would forego healthcare coverage for themselves, they would not risk their children not having coverage.

The thing is, though, that this is the movie given to us. We watch the movie growing up, and then pick a part to play. We are never told we can make our own movie. We are told we have to play by the rules, and that the current game of get up, go to work, come home, spend money, repeat, is the only one in existence. 

Some sources estimate that something like 50,000 people expatriate from the United States every year, ironically, to find freedom. Freedom from oppressive nanny states like California, freedom from the religious indoctrination of the south, freedom from the racism that is still alive and quite pathologic in the big cities like Chicago.

These people, I believe, are looking to find freedom in movement, to create their own warmth. They want to slow down. They want to stop doing the worksheets of adult life, which includes registering themselves, their car, their income, their property, every year with the state. Worksheets after worksheets, proving to Big Brother that you are, in fact, a good, moral person, with nothing to hide. 

Those who stay in the country and resist the worksheets are considered criminals. They are the outlaws in the truest sense. But our society scorns these outlaws, as if this very small percentage of people who drop out of the system somehow affects their daily collective bread. Never mind the huge money grabs of the pharmaceutical industry, big agriculture, and the military industrial complex.

Because there are only a few people who have openly stepped out of the system, life is hard for them. They certainly are not finding the warmth they were seeking when they left the system. Isolated, these people may even experience more coldness, more disconnect than when they were still part of a group they did not identify with. 

Then, something shifts. These outlaws meet other outlaws, and share their struggles, their time, and their resources. These newer self-propelled outcasts come to the realization that they are capable of sustaining themselves, instead of just fighting off the enemy. They relax into their new freedom.